Posts

Immediate Load Dental Implants

What is immediate loading of dental implants?  As you may have read in our previous blog post, dental implants are made up of several components including the dental implant, the abutment and the implant-supported crown. The dentist can decide to wait to place the dental crown on top of the implant or do so immediately when the dental implant is surgically placed into the jaw bone.

Immediate loading of dental implants is when the dental restoration (crown, denture or bridge) is affixed to the dental implant at the time of surgery. This has become a treatment option popular with patients due to faster results and better esthetics.

Alternatively to immediate loading, delayed loading of dental implants occurs when the dental restoration (crown, denture or bridge) is affixed to the dental implant after the implant has been given sufficient time to integrate with the bone.

There are several advantages and disadvantages to the immediate loading of dental implants.

Immediate Dental Implant Loading Advantages:

  • Quicker treatment as the patient does not need to come back for as many appointments.
  • Faster time from surgery to tooth as the restoration is put on at the time of surgery.
  • Optimal esthetics can be achieved at time of placement and the patient can leave the office with a tooth attached to the implant.
  • Higher patient satisfaction as a result of faster treatment.

Immediate Dental Implant Loading Disadvantages:

  • Not suitable for all patients. Everyone’s case is unique and should be evaluated by an educated dental professional to determine if immediate loading of a dental implant is right for you.
  • Can delay or prevent integration of the bone with the implant due to force placed on the implant during healing.
  • Potential for long-term implant instability and ultimately failure. This can occur because the dental implant was not given adequate time to integrate to the bone. When the dental implant integrates with the bone it is termed osseointegration.

So, are immediate load implants right for you? It’s not possible to know without a thorough consultation with a dental professional and evaluation of dental x-rays. There is a chance that this option could be a good choice for your unique situation, but we can’t say that for certain until assessing the current status of your oral health. It is worth exploring immediate load implants as a possible treatment option but don’t get too excited without doing more research. It will be possible for some patients but others will need to stick with the traditional method of delayed loading. Thank you for taking the time to visit simpli dental. If you are considering dental implants in Regina and would like to know more about your options, please feel free to contact our office and schedule a consultation.

simpli dental Regina

reception@simpli.dental

(306) 520-4473

Dental Bridge or Dental Implant? Advantages and Disadvantages

So you want to replace that missing or broken tooth? Fortunately for you there are several options to choose from including the following:

  • Removable partial dentures
  • Implant supported crowns
  • Fixed partial denture, more commonly known as a dental bridge

 

 

Removable Partial Denture

Implant Supported Crown

Dental Bridge

 

There are several advantages and disadvantages to each solution for replacing a missing tooth. A removable partial denture is just that, removable. A dental implant or bridge is fixated in the mouth and not removable.

We will look at the advantages and disadvantages of the two fixated options, bridges and implants.

Dental Implant Advantages:

  • Improved appearance
  • Better speech
  • Comfortable and natural feeling
  • Increased self-esteem
  • Improved oral health
  • Durable with a high success rate
  • Convenience in cleaning
  • Adjacent teeth remain untouched

Dental Implant Disadvantages:

  • Cost. They can be expensive.
  • Potential for complications as some implants will not integrate with the bone and fail
  • They require a minor surgery
  • They are a life-long commitment and require ongoing maintenance and sometimes even replacement of the crown/restoration.
  • Time. Often a tooth needs be extracted, the site is allowed to heal for several months, the implant is then placed and requires several months to integrate into the bone before a crown can be placed on top of the implant. A dental bridge can be completed faster. There are some cases that a crown can be placed on top of an implant at the time of surgery and therefore can be a quick procedure. These cases are best determined by an oral health professional.
  • Insurance coverage for dental implants is becoming more common but dental insurance sometimes may not cover the cost.

Dental Bridge Advantages:

  • Improved appearance
  • Better speech
  • Comfortable and natural feeling
  • Increased self-esteem
  • Improved oral health
  • Durable with a high success rate
  • Adjacent teeth can benefit from the full-coverage of the bridge restoration if the adjacent teeth are in need of crowns/full-coverage restorations.
  • Dental insurance coverage typically covers dental bridges more than they do implants. However, we are seeing this change and more insurance companies are covering the cost of a dental implant as well.
  • Time. They are typically faster to complete than a dental implant that cannot have a crown placed immediately.

Dental Bridge Disadvantages:

  • More difficult to clean than a single-tooth dental implant
  • Adjacent teeth need to be prepared and reduced resulting in a permanent loss of tooth structure.
  • Cost. Dental bridges can be expensive.
  • Potential for complications as some teeth that are used to support the bridge may need root canal treatment following preparation, the bone support could fail, the restoration could break or the supporting teeth could develop decay/cavities. If a dental bridge fails it will need to be replaced.
  • They are a life-long commitment and require ongoing maintenance and sometimes even replacement.

If you are interested in learning more about dental implants, please read our blog post here.

If you would like to schedule a consultation with a dentist in Regina at simpli dental for a free consultation to discuss replacing a broken or missing tooth. Please contact us here.

simpli dental

How much does a dental implant cost?

dental implant regina

There are many factors and components to consider when discussing the cost of a dental implant. To begin, lets start with what a dental implant is. A dental implant is a metal structure that is implanted into the jaw bone to replace the root of a tooth. This is done through a surgical approach where a small amount of bone is removed to make room for the dental implant, the implant is then placed into the jaw and then is either covered over by the patients gums and sutures or with a metal healing cap. The implant is then typically left alone to allow the bone and implant surface to integrate. There are other components that need to be considered when getting a dental implant. Technically, the implant is only the metal piece that is placed into the bone but the tooth (crown) that is placed on top is commonly grouped in with a dental implant. The crown is made by a dental laboratory typically outside of the dental clinic. The crown can be made out of several materials and include porcelain, metal (gold), or zirconia. It is attached to the implant through what we call an abutment. The crown is either cemented or screwed onto the abutment. So in summary, a tooth that is replaced with a “dental implant” is made up of three parts,

  • Dental implant
  • Abutment
  • Implant supported crown

Now, why do dental implants cost so much? There are several factors that need to be considered, they include,

  • Education
  • Price of materials
  • Specialized equipment
  • Time
  • Supply and demand
  • Third-party expenses

Education: The dental provider that is placing the surgical implant typically goes through additional training to perform this procedure. Dental implant placement surgeries are not typically taught to proficiency in undergraduate dental programs. Therefore, general dentists must take additional training where there are costs associated with travel, tuition, and downtime from work. Specialists including oral surgeons, prosthodontists, endodontists, and periodontists typically receive surgical implant placement training in their graduate studies. These programs range in time from 3 to 6 years in addition to general dentistry education.

Price of materials: In addition to the three parts discussed above (implant, abutment, and crown) there are several other materials that need to be considered. They include but are not limited to healing abutments, impression copings, impression trays, impression material, anesthetic, irrigation, consumables, and many others. Many of these items are implant specific, highly regulated, and therefore quite costly.

Specialized equipment: The equipment needed to place and restore a dental implant is typically specific to dental implants. Therefore, it cannot be used for other purposes inside a dental practice. This equipment needs to be purchased and can be expensive.

Time: Simply put, everyone’s time is worth something. If an oral health provider and their staff are spending time placing or restoring your dental implant, they need to be compensated for that time.

Supply and demand: Dental implants are becoming a more popular choice of treatment but typically are not done on a frequent basis in dental practices. As more people get implants, more manufacturers supply the necessary components, and more providers place and restore them, they may come down in price.

Third-party expenses: When a dental provider takes an impression to get your implant supported crown made, he or she typically sends it to a third-party laboratory to fabricate the crown. That laboratory has expenses (equipment, wages, rent, etc.) and charges a fee for their service.

For your reference (at the time of writing this blog post on the price of a dental implant),

  • simpli dental’s price for an implant supported crown is $661 plus laboratory (Compare at $1322 plus laboratory from the 2019 suggested fee guide)
  • The price for dental implant surgery ranges, from our experience, most providers that complete the surgeries charge between $1500 and $2000 for this procedure.
  • Other costs to consider are additional components and laboratory fees that may be passed onto the patient

We hope this sheds some light on the price of a dental implant. If you have any questions, need additional information, or would like a consultation to see if you are a candidate for a dental implant, don’t hesitate to contact us.

simpli dental